People who sleep 6 to 7 hours a night are twice as likely to be involved in a crash as those sleeping 8 hours or more.

Nearly everyone has probably been a drowsy driver at one point or another and most have probably tried the same things like cracking a window, turning up the radio, or pinching themselves to try to stay awake.

Sgt. Troy Christianson from the Minnesota State Patrol says those tricks don't work. You probably knew that, but did you know that you can be cited for drowsy driving in Minnesota? Christianson explains the possible penalties and provides some tips for motorists below.

Falling asleep at the wheel
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For starters, Christianson encouraged everyone to get a good night's sleep before hitting the road, to plan regular stops on their trip, and to avoid alcohol and medications that might make you sleepy.

The Minnesota State Patrol officer cited a study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety that shows how dangerous drowsy driving can be:  

People who sleep 6 to 7 hours a night are twice as likely to be involved in a crash as those sleeping 8 hours or more. People sleeping less than 5 hours increase their risk four to five times.

 What Is the Penalty For Drowsy Driving in Minnesota?

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Sgt. Christianson said the driver "can be cited for inattentive driving and additional serious charges could be incurred if the drowsy driver causes a crash."

Got a question about traffic laws in Minnesota? You can ask by emailing Troy.Christianson@state.mn.us

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