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If you were thinking that your fall allergies would go away now that Minnesota's seen its first snow, think again.

I don't know about you, but I've been suffering through a particularly sneezy fall allergy season. I don't get bothered much by seasonal allergies in the spring (when pollen from all the blooming plants and trees can be a trigger for some of us) or even summer-- unless it's been pretty dry when I mow the lawn.

But it's in the fall here in Minnesota when I notice the sneezing and watery eyes start making a comeback. Some years are better than others, but this year it was bad enough that I had to go back on my once-a-day allergy meds. I'd heard that once we get a hard frost, things would be better. Of course, that didn't happen early this year.

So, when the snow started falling Tuesday, I thought, hey-- at least my fall allergies will be gone, right? Wrong. At least, that's the word I found from this WebMD story that says once the temperature drops, the wind picks up and the snow falls, there could be a whole new set of allergy triggers here in Minnesota. So what's up with new allergies here in the cold weather season? WebMD explains:

The reason is simple: Many of those same warm-weather irritants are around all year, like pet dander, mold, and mildew. And once you settle indoors for the chilly holiday season -- the windows closed, the heater on -- your exposure to these allergen can spike.

Heck, WebMD even says that firewood we bring in to create a warm, crackling fire in the fireplace on a cold Minnesota fall evening could be a trigger-- if you're allergic to mold spores, which find the damp wood a perfect place to camp out. You can read more about what causes winter allergies-- and how to treat them-- HERE.

And speaking of our now-early-arriving winter, are you stocked up for the long haul? Keep scrolling to take a look at some things experts say might be in short supply this season-- so you can grab them now before they're gone.

Listen to Curt St. John from 6 to 10 a.m. on Quick Country 96.5
and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on 103.9 The Doc